austynallison

Posts Tagged ‘journalism’

Why the Huffington Post is like a mullet

In Digital, Journalism, Media on February 10, 2011 at 12:26 am

This, below, from The New Yorker,  from 2008. It’s a nice description. I wonder whether AOL will keep the business-up-front-party-behind strategy going now it’s bought HuffPo.

 

The Huffington Post’s editorial processes are based on what Peretti has named the “mullet strategy.” (“Business up front, party in the back” is how his trend-spotting site BuzzFeed glosses it.) “User-generated content is all the rage, but most of it totally sucks,” Peretti says. The mullet strategy invites users to “argue and vent on the secondary pages, but professional editors keep the front page looking sharp. The mullet strategy is here to stay, because the best way for Web companies to increase traffic is to let users have control, but the best way to sell advertising is a slick, pretty front page where corporate sponsors can admire their brands.”

via Arianna Huffington and the death of newspapers : The New Yorker.

Advertisements

Mike Tindall, Mark Tindall; same difference, no?

In Journalism on December 22, 2010 at 11:41 pm

The latest royal engagement reminds me why I’m not a tabloid sub. (And it’s not because I didn’t want to be.)

Mike Tindall is going to marry Zara Phillips in another royal wedding.

I might have been subbing a story about their approaching nuptials for the Mirror if it hadn’t been for, well, Mike Tindall. Read the rest of this entry »

Can Forbes help brands do the write thing?

In Advertising, Digital, Journalism, Marketing, Media, Public relations on December 10, 2010 at 12:53 am

If Forbes is letting bloggers pay to write under its name, should we embrace this and let brands learn to engage rather than preach and plug?

I managed to run 10km today. But that’s beside the point. Except that it was on the way back from this run that I was listening to an Ad Age podcast that talked about how Forbes is selling its name to bloggers (you can read the article the podcast was discussing here). Read the rest of this entry »

A question of trust

In Communicate, Digital, Dubai, Journalism, Media, Opinion on November 28, 2010 at 8:26 pm

With more sources of news, “Who do I believe?” is becoming “How much do I believe them?”

Originally published in Communicate, July 2010

What media can you trust? The question came up when Dubai’s Shelter hosted a round-table discussion entitled, “Journalism 2.0.” It marked the launch of SAE Institute’s diploma in digital journalism. The debate pitted old journalism against new journalism. Read the rest of this entry »

Iran’s user generation

In Communicate, Journalism, Published journalism, Q&A, Television on November 24, 2010 at 3:55 pm

Former head of BBC Persian Rob Beynon tells Communicate that social networks may have been pivotal in the Iranian elections, but they don’t mean news is dead

Originally published in Communicate, February 2010

Rob Beynon is CEO of DMA Media, the consultancy firm that helped Abu Dhabi Media Company set up twofour54, its media hub. DMA was also involved in launching the BBC’s Arabic and Farsi television services, and in June 2009 Beynon was the acting head of BBC Persian as the Iranian election result sparked mass protests, rioting and outbreaks of violence.
Communicate sat down with Beynon to ask him about the role user-generated content played in the channel’s coverage of events. Read the rest of this entry »

Chat’s the way to do it

In Communicate, Dubai, Journalism, Opinion, Public relations, Published journalism on November 24, 2010 at 3:43 pm

Communicate joins the Ramadan feeding frenzy and finds that focus-free feasting will serve a good host well

Originally published in Communicate, October 2009

“It was like the buffet was a wounded gazelle and the marketing folk were starved lions,” says one friend of Communicate, talking about an iftar to which we weren’t invited (This is unthinkable, don’t they know who we are?).

Well, it’s reassuring to know that we journalists aren’t alone in being, “a bunch of good-for-nothing freeloading gannets” (in the words of the same friend) during Ramadan. For many in the press pack the Holy Month is all about getting fed, and in these strained times the frenzy for freebie food has seemed even more desperate than usual. And rightly so – this could be the only dining out most of us manage all year. Read the rest of this entry »

Star turn

In Journalism, Published journalism on November 23, 2010 at 6:03 pm

The fall and rise of Lebanon’s only English-language daily newspaper

By Austyn Allison and Nathalie Bontems

Originally published in Communicate, April 2009

The Daily Star is up and running again, after the Beirut-based newspaper almost closed for good in January. The Star’s publisher, editor and CEO, Jamal Mroue, tells Communicate that the return to print signifies the latest chapter of a “saga” that began around 10 years ago when one bank bought another. Read the rest of this entry »

Press conference saves babies

In Communicate, Dubai, Journalism, Marketing, Public relations, Published journalism on November 23, 2010 at 1:40 pm

P&G vaccinates 100 newborns for everyone who attends campaign launch

Originally published in Communicate, July 2008

Communicate (and some other journos) saved some babies yesterday. By going to a press conference.

We were intrigued by a press release from IPN, on behalf of P&G’s Pampers diaper brand, inviting us to attend the launch of their “1 large pack = 1 tetanus vaccine” campaign, run in partnership with UNICEF. It promised that, “P&G has pledged to donate 100 additional vaccines towards the campaign for every person who attends the press conference.” Journalists were encouraged to bring family and friends to further boost numbers at the presser. Read the rest of this entry »

Piersing insight

In Communicate, Dubai, Journalism, Published journalism on November 22, 2010 at 11:31 pm

Piers Morgan urges regional media to get more aggressive and stop kowtowing

Originally published in Communicate, December 2007

Piers Morgan came to the Media and Marketing Conference to discuss celebrities, and how they can be used by regional media. But when he took to the podium, although the one-time Fleet Street editor – now “shamelessly pursuing celebrity status myself” as a judge on America’s Got Talent – spoke a little about star power, he spent most of his 30-minute speech berating the regional press for being cowed and timid. Read the rest of this entry »